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Digital Making

Servo Symbol01 Pca9685 Image06 Servo & Stepper Motor KitStepper Motor Image06


Servo Stepper Motor Kit02 20170723 172003 1000w

The Raspberry Pi Servo & Stepper Motor Kit provides the components and instructions to let you explore how a Raspberry Pi (not supplied) with Python coding can control and drive servo and stepper motors in various ways. Each method uses a subset of the components, connected together using a breadboard, and then connected to a  Raspberry Pi to control and manage how the components operate.

Any model of Raspberry Pi can be used but a Raspberry Pi 3 is recommended and you should also be using at least the latest 'Jessie' version of Raspbian – if you have an earlier operating system version, you will need to carry out an update before installing the software and documentation for this Kit. We have now also completed some initial tests with the very latest 'Stretch' version of Raspbian and have not, as yet, seen any issues.

For Python coding, whilst some knowledge is useful this is not essential since the kit provides an opportunity to explore and start to understand coding with Python.

The kit comes with a Raspberry Pi GPIO template to assist in identifying the correct connections to the Pi’s GPIO pins, as shown in the image below right. An included ‘Getting started’ leaflet also shows you how to download a series of detailed support documents as well as the Python programs for each of the control and drive methods.

 

*** To order a Digital Making Servo & Stepper Motor Kit, click here ***

 

Kit Component summary:

Servo Kit I2c 2btn 20170625 114321 1000w

2 x SG90 micro servos

1 x PCA9685 I2C PWM controller board

1 x 28BYJ-48 stepper motor

1 x ULN2003 stepper motor driver board

1 x 170 point breadboard

7 x male-to-female jumper leads

2 x tactile buttons

5 x male-to-male jumper leads

1 x 4xAA battery box

6 x female-to-female jumper leads

 

The Control and Drive Methods:

The Servo & Stepper Motor Kit provides the components listed above for use with a Raspberry Pi to assemble and explore Python software for these control and drive methods:

  • Simple single servo button control: direct connection and powering of a single servo by the Raspberry Pi using a button to initiate movement.
  • I2C PWM control of single servo: using the Inter-integrated Circuit (I2C) protocol and Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) to control and drive a single servo connected to a PCA9685 control  board and powered by 4xAA batteries (not supplied).
  • I2C PWM control of two servos: using the Inter-integrated Circuit (I2C) protocol and Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) to control and drive two servos connected to a PCA9685 control  board and powered by 4xAA batteries (not supplied).
  • Semaphore flagging demo: building upon the 'I2C PWM control of two servos' method, two servos are used to build a 'fun' demo that allows semaphore messages to be 'flagged' - see the video clip below.
  • Wave drive sequence stepper motor control: using a Darlington array ULN2003 control board and a wave drive step sequence to control and drive a stepper motor.
  • Half-step sequence stepper motor control: using a Darlington array ULN2003 control board and a half-step sequence to control and drive a stepper motor.
  • Full-step sequence stepper motor control: using a Darlington array ULN2003 control board and a full-step sequence to control and drive a stepper motor.
  • CPU temperature gauge demo: building upon the 'Full-step sequence stepper motor control', the stepper motor is used in a 'real' demo to 'drive' the needle of a gauge, updating it every second or so, to indicate the current temperature of the Raspberry Pi's CPU - see the video clip below.
  • Browser control of the 'semaphore' and 'gauge' demos: both the 'Semaphore flagging demo' and the 'CPU temperature gauge demo' are combined with a web server giving browser access to control both these demos at the same time.

Instructions are provided to download all the documentation and the programs for each of the methods above.

A battery box that houses 4 AA batteries (batteries not supplied) is provided to separately power the servo and stepper motors in some of the arrangements. Nickel metal hydride (Ni-Mh) rechargeable batteries, each with more than 2500mAh capacity, are recommended.

 

This kit is aimed at ages 10 and above, although with adult supervision, ages as young as 7 should be able to assemble the components and use the different methods, although at this early age help will be required with the documentation and the Python coding may not be fully understood.

 

Workshops and other demonstration events in the Marlborough area are being planned to provide support in the use of all the Digital Making Kits. If you would like to be kept informed about upcoming workshops and events then please click here to send us an email - it would also be particularly useful if you could let us know if you would be interested in purchasing any of the Digital Making Kits as that would greatly help with our planning.

 

 

short video clip showing 2 servos 'flagging' a semaphore message
how's your semaphore? can you read the message?
(may not show in Chrome or Mac Safari for some reason - sorry! try using FireFox instead)

 

 

short video clip showing a stepper motor driving a 'gauge' needle indicating the CPU temperature
which is read every second or so and used to 'drive' the stepper motor forwards or backwards
(may not show in Chrome or Mac Safari for some reason - sorry! try using FireFox instead)

 

 

Details on each of the Digital Making Kits:

Page last modified on Monday 11 September 2017 16:39:24 BST